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Healthy Choice Catering Partnership

Consumer Information

 

Introduction

Food And Nutrition

Food Labels

Salt

Saturated Fat

Healthy Recipes

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Introduction

 

We have been working with local caterers to help them to reduce the level of fats, saturated fats, salt and sugars in the food they serve and to make it easier for their customers to eat healthily. We recognised that it was very difficult for consumers to make healthy choices easily in catering outlets because they are not required by law to display nutritional information about the food they serve. Healthy Choice Partnership Poster

 

Caterers who register in the scheme have to ensure that the food they serve is healthier by introducing steps such as increasing the proportion of vegetables, pulses and beans in recipes; using lower fat alternatives of ingredients such as cheese, meats and mayonnaise and introducing healthier options to each area of their menus.

 

The scheme is free and open to all retail catering outlets such as sandwich bars, cafes, restaurants and takeaways that have gained at least 3 stars under the Tees Valley Food Hygiene Award.

 

Our food standard officers carry out audits visits to caterers to check that healthy catering practices are being followed. They also assess the nutritional content of the healthy choices being served – either by analysis of the food being served or by recipe checks.

 

Healthy choice menu items must meet specific nutritional specifications. These are based on the Food Standards Agency’s traffic light system that you will have seen on pre-packed foods sold in retail shops. Foods must qualify as green or amber for levels of fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar per 100g and total levels per portion have also been set as outlined below:

 

Nutrient Green

Level per 100g of food

Amber

Level per 100g of food

Each portion must contain no more than
Fat <=3g >3g to 20g 21g
Saturated Fat <=1.5g >1.5 to 5g 6g
Salt <=0.3g >0.3 to1.5g 2.4g
Sugar <=5g >5g to 15g 21g

 

Caterers use the healthy choice logo so that healthy choices are clearly signposted for customers.  So if you want to make a healthy choice look out for the logo. Please select these links for a leaflet containing details of the scheme and a list of caterers taking part.

 

Why not ask your local takeaway or sandwich bar about what healthy choices they offer?

 

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Food and Nutrition

 

The Livewell pages on the NHS website have lots of information and tips about food, nutrition, healthy eating and lots more to help you choose a healthier lifestyle.

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Food Labels

 

Traffic LightsFood labels are packed with lots of useful information about the products we eat and understanding this information can help us make healthier food choices.

 

The new traffic light labelling system allows consumers to see at a glance if the food has high, low or medium levels of fat, saturated fat, salt and sugar.

 

For more information visit this site

 

 

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Salt

 

It is recommended adults should have no more than 6 grams (g) of salt a day, that’s one and a half level teaspoons. On average people are actually having about 9g of salt a day.

Too much salt can cause high blood pressure which increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease.

 

Salt Shaker

One of the reasons that many people’s salt intake is too high is that three quarters of their intake comes from processed foods. This makes it very difficult for people to monitor the amount of salt they are consuming.

 

Levels of salt in foods which many people consider relatively healthy such as cereals and bread products can contain high levels of salt. Different brands of similar products can contain very different amounts of salt.

 

For more information on the health affects of eating too much salt and tips on how to cut down visit this site.

 

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Saturated Fat

 

PiesEating a diet that is high in saturated fat can raise the level of cholesterol in the blood. High cholesterol increases the risk of heart disease. These practical tips can help you cut down on saturated fat.

 

Saturated fat is the kind of fat found in butter and lard, pies cakes and biscuits, fatty cuts of meat, sausages and bacon, and cheese and cream.

 

Most of us eat too much saturated fat – about 20% more than the recommended maximum amount:

  • The average man should eat no more than 30g of saturated fat a day.

  • The average woman should eat no more than 20g of saturated fat a day.

For more information on the health affects of eating too much saturated fat and tips on how to cut down visit this site.

 

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Healthy RecipesPeppers

 

 

For a range of healthy recipes and ideas for breakfast, lunches, dinners and snacks why not check out the Change4life website.

 

 

 

 

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